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About the BGS

The British Geriatrics Society is the professional body of specialist doctors, nurses, therapists and other professionals concerned with the health care of older people in the United Kingdom.

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Vacancy: BGS Officers


The BGS is inviting expressions of interest from BGS members to fill the vacancies of Deputy Media Digital Media Editor (deadline for applications Friday 6 April, midnight) and Vice President for Academic Affairs (deadline for applications, Friday, 20 April, midnight). For background and person specifications, click the link of the position which interests you (downloadable in pdf format).

2018 Spring Meeting

Registration now open

Abstract submissions: Research abstracts are automatically accepted. Clinical Quality abstracts are adjudicated. Results available here on 5 March

Clinical Excellence Awards 2018

The next round of clinical excellence awards opens on the 13 February 2018.

All candidates seeking the support of the BGS are asked to complete the appropriate form(s) and submit these to the Society by 5.00 p.m. on Tuesday 6 March 2018. This is a finite deadline and we will be unable to accept forms after this date.

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BGS Staff Vacancy

The BGS is inviting applications to fill its vacancy for a Membership Administrator. Interviews will be held on 29 March. The closing date for applications is 19th March. Click here for details.

Number of older people with four or more diseases will double by 2035, say researchers

BGS, London (23 January 2018): A study published in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, reports that the number of older people diagnosed with four or more diseases will double between 2015 and 2035. A third of these people will be diagnosed with dementia, depression or a cognitive impairment.

The study, conducted by researchers at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing, found that over the next 20 years there will be a massive expansion in the number of people suffering from multiple diseases, known as multi-morbidity. As a result two-thirds of the life expectancy gains, predicted as 3.6 years for men, 2.9 years for women, will be spent with four or more diseases.

Over the next 20 years the largest increase in diagnoses will be cancer (up by 179.4%) and diabetes (up by 118.1%) in the older population, whilst arthritis and cancer will see the greatest rise in prevalence. In the population over the age of 85 years all diseases, apart from dementia and depression, will more than double in absolute numbers between 2015 and 2035.  

Professor Carol Jagger, Professor of Epidemiology of Ageing at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing led the study which has developed the Population Ageing and Care Simulation (PACSim) model. She said: “Much of the increase in four or more diseases, which we term complex multi-morbidity, is a result of the growth in the population aged 85 years and over. More worryingly, our model shows that future young–old adults, aged 65 to 74 years, are more likely to have two or three diseases than in the past. This is due to their higher prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity which are risk factors for multiple diseases.”

In the UK, healthcare delivery was built, and generally remains centred, on the treatment of single diseases.

Professor Jagger adds: “These findings have enormous implications for how we should consider the structure and resources for the NHS in the future. Multi-morbidity increases the likelihood of hospital admission and a longer stay, along with a higher rate of readmission, and these factors will continue to contribute to crises in the NHS.”

The authors state that patients with complex multi-morbidity need a different approach.

They conclude that a single-disease-focused model of health care is unsuitable for patients with multi-morbidity. There needs to be a focus on prevention of disease, and a bespoke healthcare service provision for patients with multi-morbidity.

The Age & Ageing paper ‘Projections of multi-morbidity in the older population in England to 2035: estimates from the Population Ageing and Care Simulation (PACSim) model’ can be viewed from 9am on 23 January here: https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ageing/afx201   


Notes to editors

This work forms part of the MODEM project (A comprehensive approach to MODelling outcome and costs impacts of interventions for DEMentia), funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).  

To arrange an interview with Professor Carol Jagger, Newcastle University please contact the press office, 0191 208 7850 or

Age and Ageing is an international journal publishing peer reviewed original articles and commissioned reviews on geriatric medicine and gerontology. It is circulated to over 8,156 academic and healthcare institutions, with over 124,000 downloads a month and a growing citation rate (Impact Factor of 4.282 and ranked 9th in JCR Si: Geriatrics & Gerontology category). Its range includes research on ageing and clinical, epidemiological, and psychological aspects of later life. It is published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. Follow Age and Ageing on Twitter @Age_and_Ageing
 
The British Geriatrics Society (BGS) is the professional association of doctors practising geriatric medicine, nurses, therapists, researchers, GPs, old age psychiatrists and others engaged in the specialist care of older people and in promoting better health in old age. It has over 3,400 members and is the only society in the UK offering specialist medical expertise in the wide range of health care needs of older people. 

Oxford Journals is a division of Oxford University Press. We publish well over 230 academic and research journals covering a broad range of subject areas, two-thirds of which are published in collaboration with learned societies and other international organizations. We have been publishing journals for more than a century, and as part of the world’s oldest and largest university press, have more than 500 years of publishing expertise behind us. Follow Oxford Journals on Twitter @OxfordJournals

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