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Fit for Frailty Part 2

The Fit for Frailty guidance were born out of workshop meetings held at the offices of the British Geriatrics Society and AGE UK in London. Fit for Frailty Part 1  provides advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings and is aimed at all levels of health and social care professionals working in the community who may encounter older people living with frailty, including ambulance staff, nurses, therapists, social workers etc.

Fit for Frailty Part 2 follows on from this and provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. Is is aimed at GPs, geriatricians, Health Service managers, Social Service managers and Commissioners of Services.

Fit for Frailty Part 2 has been developed in partnership with Royal College of General Practitioners and Age UK, providing guidance on commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings. It aims to be an invaluable resource for all GPs, geriatricians, Health Service managers, Social Service managers and Commissioners of Services.

Frailty is an increasingly urgent issue facing health care service design. Older people are the main users of health and social care services; approximately 10 per cent of people aged over 65, and 25 to 50 per cent of those aged over 85, are living with frailty. Research suggests that only half of older people with frailty syndromes receive effective health care interventions.
 
There is a risk of significant harm to patients with frailty if health interventions are planned for them in the absence of recognition of their frailty. There is some evidence that focusing community services on those with frailty rather than on those ‘at highest risk of hospital admission’ might improve quality of patient care and reduce hospital bed usage.
 
Older people with frailty have been the victims of many of the quality failings in health and social care over the last five years, for example at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. These were problems which might have been avoided had patients’ frailty and concomitant special needs been identified and appropriate management plans put in place.
 
I’m therefore very proud to share Fit or Frailty Part 2 with you; I hope it will play a major role in helping you to design and commission high-quality care for your patients.

Gill Turner
Project Lead and Vice President: Clinical Quality

 

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