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Funding the Future - the value of a BGS Grant

A personal perspective by Felicity Jones

The BGS Young Doctors Educational Grant enabled me to attend the Society’s 2014 Spring Meeting, the second BGS Scientific Meeting I have attended. As with the former, I found it provided an amazing opportunity to listen and learn from some of the most renowned geriatricians of our time. Whilst helping with the microphones, I found myself chatting to Dr Kate Granger, who is rightly seen as one of the most inspiring doctors of our time, before she gave a powerful speech about the use of social media and the importance of compassion in medicine. Having long admired Kate and being a wholehearted supporter of these messages, it was amazing to meet her, and to see many others in the audience also deeply affected by her speech.  Other presentations I enjoyed included a session on the recruitment landscape for geriatrics – defying the prevalent myth that geriatrics is an unpopular specialty and discussing the potential for imaginative dual accreditation training in the future (e.g. in GP and geriatrics, or palliative care and geriatrics) – and ‘Vertigo, dizziness and balance disorders in the older person’ which gave a cutting-edge synopsis of the vestibular system that enabled me to answer one of the trickier questions in my written finals paper! 

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Unfit for purpose? Undergraduate Medical Training is not teaching doctors enough about ageing

Adam Gordon and Adrian Blundell write here about a programme of work better to understand how UK medical schools teach about ageing, undertaken on behalf of the BGS.

Older patients make up the lion’s share of work for the National Health Service – as they do for the health services of all developed, and many developing, economies. Most doctors currently in practice will spend the bulk of their career dealing with older patients. Many of those older patients will have frailty, or physical dependency, or multiple medical conditions. Many will have all three.

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Mini-GEMS - E-learning videos in geriatric medicine

Amongst technologically-inclined educators, there is considerable support for the concept of high-quality Free, Open-Access ‘Meducation’ (#FOAM). Here, Mark Garside and his colleagues describes AEME’s development of an online education resource for geriatric medicine which exploits the principles of FOAM.

The application of social media as a tool for the delivery of medical education is rapidly growing in popularity, and is starting to gain widespread acceptance amongst the medical profession1. Amongst technologically-inclined educators, there is a lot of support for the concept of high-quality Free, Open-Access ‘Meducation’ (#FOAM).

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What Should We be Teaching Our Undergraduates About Ageing?

The over 65s comprise between 15 per cent and 18 per cent of admissions to UK Emergency Departments1-2 and two-thirds of acute hospital inpatients in England and Wales and 36 per cent of acute admissions are over 653.

The impact of frailty in determining the workload of doctors has been acknowledged across specialties as diverse as general practice (NHS long-term conditions framework4) and elective surgical specialties such as the National Confidential Enquiry into Perioperative Deaths5 (NCEPOD).

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